iamedwin
Urban Designer, Master Planner, Placemaking, Branding

An ongoing feed of content I learn from that drives my design thinking.

An on going feed of content I learn from that drives my design thinking.

Road diets: designing a safer street by Vox Media

Today, we now know that bigger roads and extra traffic lanes do nothing to solve congestion. In fact, it tends to induce even more traffic. So we didn’t fix the congestion issues, and on top of that, we built wide roads that are relatively unsafe. Transportation planners in the 21st century recognized that many of the roads that were overbuilt could be redesigned to calm speeding and add space for newer multimodal transportation options. And thus, the road diet was born.

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How The Shed was made: The kinetic architecture of New York’s newest cultural institution

The Shed, all disciplines, for all audiences. The Shed brings together established and emerging artists in fields ranging from hip hop to classical music, painting to digital media, theater to literature, and sculpture to dance in an unprecedented movable structure that adapts to support all kinds of inventive work under one roof.

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Transforming cities with technology by The Economist

“By 2050, two thirds of the world’s population will live in cities. Urbanisation is happening faster than at any time in human history. Globally, 900 million people are living in slums. Cities can’t add housing fast enough. Today, an estimated one billion vehicles are already bringing urban areas to a standstill. Cities consume three-quarters of the world’s energy each year and are responsible for around 50% of greenhouse gas emissions.

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Hottest trends of 2018: First and Last Mile with Dockless Electric Scooters by Vox Media

“Even in cities with exceptional public transportation coverage, gaps persist. This is a decades old problem, often referred to as ‘the last mile/first mile.’ Cities traditionally address the last mile problem by expanding bus routes. But as cities continue to populate while transportation dept budgets dwindle, the patience of commuters is running dry. So scooters, electric skateboards, and pedal assist bikes have become an increasingly popular option for city residents.

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Edwin Chan
How public spaces make cities work

More than 8 million people are crowded together to live in New York City. What makes it possible? In part, it's the city's great public spaces -- from tiny pocket parks to long waterfront promenades -- where people can stroll and play. Amanda Burden helped plan some of the city's newest public spaces, drawing on her experience as, surprisingly, an animal behaviorist. She shares the unexpected challenges of planning parks people love -- and why it's important.

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Meet Stephen Ross, The Billionaire Behind NYC's Hudson Yards Project | Forbes

On Friday, March 15 the public will get to experience Hudson Yards for the first time, when more than 100 stores and two-dozen places to drink and dine open for business. The $25 billion project was conceived in the shadow of September 11th, financed in the wake of the financial crisis and built through the greatest luxury condo boom New York has ever seen. It’s making its debut amid an anti-capitalist, anti-building backlash that Ross, one of nation’s most successful real estate developers with a net worth of $7.7 billion, didn’t see coming.

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Pricing Design Work & Creativity

Confused about how to price creative services? Are you charging hourly versus value based pricing? Is there a better way to determine what is fair to you and fair to the client? Watch this video and see how much money you are potentially leaving on the table by not pricing the client. Price the client and not the job.

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What happens when nature goes viral?

Horseshoe Bend used to be a little-known roadside view of the Colorado River in Page, Arizona. But over the past few years, the spot has witnessed a dramatic increase in popularity. The main culprit for that uptick? Instagram. It’s now one of many hidden treasures across America that have become too popular for their own good — requiring extensive redesign to protect the visitors and the environment. With visitation at a record 84 million in 2017, America’s national parks are more popular than ever — and social media is rewriting the rules of how and why people visit them.

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Core Studio Public Lecture: Virgil Abloh, “Insert Complicated Title Here”

Virgil Abloh (Rockford, IL 1980) is an architect, engineer, creative director, and designer. After earning a degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Wisconsin Madison, he completed a Master´s degree in Architecture at the Illinois Institute of Technology. It was here that he learned not only about design principles but also about the concept of collaborative working. He studied a curriculum devised by Mies van der Rohe on a campus van der Rohe had designed. After completing his degree, Abloh soon took on the role as a creative director for Kanye West and for West´s creative think tank “Donda“.

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Zhang Jian and Meng Yan, “Urban Coexistence: City Upon the City by Harvard GSD

MENG Yan was appointed chief curator of the Shenzhen Pavilion in 2010 Shanghai Expo, and is appointed to be one of the chief curators for 2017 Shenzhen-Hong Kong Urbanism\ Architecture Bi-City Biennale (Shenzhen). Zhang Jian is an Architect and the Chairman of Shum Yip Land Company Limited. Shum Yip Land Company Limited is a subsidiary of Shum Yip Group Company Limited, a State Owned Enterprise, with a net worth around RMB 30billion (USD 4.5billion). Shum Yip Land Company Limited engages in commercial property development, property portfolio development, and property management.

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Edwin Chan
The problems with rebuilding beaches by Vox Media

About 80 to 90 percent of sandy beaches along America's coastlines are eroding. This is a problem because the developments humans build near them are static. So as beaches shrink, coastal hazards can threaten to damage or destroy homes and businesses while negatively impacting tourism that depends on the beach.

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Edwin Chan
How humans disrupted a cycle essential to all life by Vox Media

Carbon cycles through earth at a steady pace. Plants and microorganisms absorb carbon, which helps them grow. Animals and bacteria eat the plants, breathe out carbon into the atmosphere, and take some carbon underground when they die. And a similar process happens in the ocean. It's nearly a closed loop, although some plants and animals don't decay fast enough so they turn into fossil fuel, which traps the carbon underground. But one animal started to dig up that carbon — and burn it.

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